COBCOE recently released a new report titled “Review of European business views
on the Transition Period” which comprised of business input from businesses in the UK and across the EU. Some of the input came from our Brexit Ambition Roundtable February 2018 event held at the chamber. This report was shared with government official and is aimed to influence current negotiations between the UK and EU.

 

To view the full report click here.

Brussels Moves!

Help shape the future of the city and have your say on transport, air pollution and voting rights for foreigners. Ahead of The Bulletin’s debate on 26 April, we’d like to hear your opinions on how to make our city a better place. Fill in our quick survey here.

The Bulletin invites you to the free event, followed by networking and a free drink.
When: Thursday 26 April, 19.00-21.30
Where: KBC Group, Avenue du Port 2, 1080 Brussels (metro Yser)
Book your place here now!

 

Glenn Press Quote Draft 2

The British Chamber welcomes the EU and UK transitional agreement allowing additional time for a deep and comprehensive future relationship agreement to be negotiated. We also, welcome the UK and EU’s joint intention to achieve a post-transition relationship that satisfies the mutual interests flourishing between them.

We ask:

• the European Council to deliver a negotiation mandate which enables the broadest and deepest possible relationship between the UK and EU to be agreed,

• the UK to present, without delay, its written proposals for a deep and comprehensive future relationship with the EU27 as soon as possible, and that this proposal contain sufficient details on how trade between the UK and EU in each business sector will function, so that EU and UK business have enough time to understand how it will need to adapt and minimise disruption to customers, supply-chains and the workforce.

bake-off-2018-banner-date-time

The yearly charity baking competition organised by the Brussels New Generation, the young professionals group of the British Chamber, is back for a 6th edition!

About the charity…

CHS small logoThe event, like in the past years, will raise money for the Community Help Services (CHS), a Brussels-based non-profit organisation that provides a free 24/7 confidential English-speaking helpline.
Their work is extremely important for the expat and local community and they seriously need our help to continue the amazing work they’ve been doing so far. So this year more than ever we would like to raise as much as possible for CHS.

About the theme…

In the past years we have seen amazing cakes in all shapes and sizes, showing off the teams baking abilities as well as their creative talents.

After the sugar paste feast of the previous years, induced by our wacky themes and categories, we thought that coming back to the art of simple baking would be very welcomed by the audience as well as the jury.
Therefore, this year we are going back to baking basics, hence the tagline Bake to Basics (get it? Bake –Back, shout-out to our intern Luca for coming up with it).

And the categories for the 2018 edition are…

categories Bake to Basics

The teams will be sorted into categories on the 4th of May live on the Brussels New Generation Facebook page.

About participating…

You can join in the fun in different ways:

  1. Register a team of max.4 and get baking for a good cause. Click here for more information and team registration.
  2. If you are not much of a baker you can join us as a taster on the evening of the 28th of May  (tasters registration will open on the 7th of May).
  3. You can also become a CHS Donor, a Drink Sponsor, or Gift Donor. For more information on that feel free to contact Francesca@britishchamber.eu.

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

 

 

 

Women in Digital International Women's Day fb banner

 

Věra Jourová is the European Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality since 2014. She shares her message on gender equality in digital spaces today on International Women’s Day.

I am delighted to talk to you  today on International Women’s Day. This is a day to celebrate women’s achievements in many fields of life. For me, as EU Commissioner for Gender Equality, it is also a day to remember that we are far from equality between women and men.

One area where I’m sure you’ll agree there is still a large gender imbalance is in the digital field.

The digital opportunity

The sad reality is that women make up less than one in five ICT graduates in the EU, and this figure is only declining. Even our youngsters are not embracing opportunities. I find this depressing– it is not that women are incompetent or uninterested! On the contrary, we know that there are no major differences between the basic digital skills of young men and women.

We must ask ourselves what is shaping choices of girls from an early age? We found that only 16% of the almost 8 million people working in ICT are women. To make things worse, there is a high drop-out rate of women from digital jobs, which results in an annual productivity loss of around 16 billion euros in the EU.

However, for the women that do work in this sector, the digital sector is indeed a rather equal workplace. For example, research shows that, in the tech sector, men and women who share the same non-managerial jobs and similar backgrounds tend to earn the same. But, we must not forget that the hierarchical structures are still very much dominated by men, with women representing only a tiny portion of the tech industry’s top leadership.

All hands on board for gender equality

Empowering women in digital spaces goes hand in hand with gender equality and empowering women more broadly. With an average score of 66.2 out of 100 on the Gender Equality Index, the EU is still a long way off from reaching a gender-equal society. We need concrete actions and this is why, throughout my mandate, I have launched several initiatives which can bring real improvements.

A very important issue we are trying to tackle is equal access to economic resources. It is not just a matter of women’s economic independence. It is a prerequisite for the achievement of economic growth, prosperity and competitiveness. Progress has been slowing: in fact, the employment gap and pay gap have remained pretty similar in recent years. The persistence of these gaps led us to take action. We realised without action we would be stuck with progress at a snail’s pace!

In November 2017, we announced a concrete response to put an end to the gender pay gap through an Action Plan to be delivered until the end of this mandate, in 2019.

In April 2017, we announced the EU Social Pillar to give equal opportunities to men and women in the working place, specifically through the work-life balance proposal. With these new rules, we would be giving equal weighting to leave provisions for mothers and fathers alike. We want to offer people choice so they have opportunities to chase their dreams and arrange their lives how they see fit.

We are also working to improve the gender balance in companies at all management levels and encourage governments and social partners to adopt concrete measures to improve gender balance in decision-making.

And when it comes to digital, one of our top priorities is to tackle the lack of skilled ICT professionals. The Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, launched in December 2017, brings together stakeholders who take action in order to tackle the digital skills gap in Europe. In one year, members of the Coalition have provided several million training courses on digital, both online and face to face, to Europeans and now they are running through 18 National Coalitions.

In 2017, we also launched the Digital Opportunity Traineeship. This is pilot project that will provide around 6,000 students with experience in cybersecurity, artificial intelligence, programming and big data in the period 2018-2020. This is of course is directed equally and women and men.

As you can see, many of the initiatives go beyond legislative action and they are a proof of the multi-stakeholder approach, which the EU has firmly embraced.

So, today, I call you, as company and business representatives, to action. You have a key role in helping people to upskill and foster their careers, by offering equal opportunities to men and women in the workplace.  Only with joint efforts will we make Digital a women’s world too. I am committed to defend equal rights and opportunities on the labour market for men and women and I am counting on your support!

 

I wish you all a Happy Women’s Day!

Eva Maydell is a Bulgarian MEP in the EPP Group. She is a member of the IMCO committee and substitute in ECON. In 2017, she was elected as President of the largest pro-European organisation European Movement International and the first woman to take this position in the organisation’s history.

We caught up with her a couple of weeks ago for another insight into the day to day lives of MEPs at the European Parliament.

Three years into the mandate, there is definitely not a single day that was the same as another. I’m constantly racing against time. Don’t get me wrong, I love this dynamism of my job and it’s definitely one of the reasons why I love doing it.

January 24th, the Bulgarian Presidency has already started and I consider this as an opportunity to promote my country in every possible way. Because of the Presidency, I believe many people in Brussels and Europe will see that Bulgaria is a vibrant European member state, giving opportunities for businesses and young entrepreneurs to develop their ideas.

Making our way through the Brussels traffic en route to the Committee of the Regions, where I am about to open the conference on building the entrepreneurial ecosystems of the future. Traffic could be a slight boredom, yet I try to make use of this time and speak with my team over the phone, planning the day and quickly going through e-mails. Here I am, arriving at the CoR and it is exciting to meet and talk with representatives from regions across the EU, see the energy and passion they put into creating the right conditions for entrepreneurship to thrive.

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On my way back to the European Parliament, I managed to squeeze a phone interview on the Western Balkans. It is crucial for the EU to be involved in the processes there for reasons of stability, solidarity and security. Quickly passing through the office to get some documents and I am rushing on to the ECON Committee to hear Bulgarian Minister Goranov outlining the Bulgarian Presidency Priorities.

I head off to the first Board Meeting of the European Movement International which I am President of. Upon my election as President of EMI I stated that we must try to bring more Europeans to the project through uniting all pro-European forces of the continent, by starting and supporting the real, bottom-up pan-European debate on the Future of Europe, while positioning EMI as a cornerstone organisation that reaches beyond the European institutions [run on sentence]. It is crucial also to ‘win’ the hearts and minds of the next generation, to encourage them to feel European and call themselves Europeans, for a more united, stronger and inspiring Europe; one that doesn’t fail on its principles. Today’s board meeting was one to try and map out how we will achieve this ambitious agenda.

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Going back to the Parliament, I’m passing by my favourite place to grab a fresh orange juice. In the hectic environment of the EP I really try to make time for fresh juices, vegetables and fruits in order to I keep my body and mind energised.

Kicking off my last event on the agenda today. I have the pleasure to bring together the Bulgarian Minister on Education and my fellow colleagues across the different political groups to discuss quality education and a new pilot project, partnered with Teach for Bulgaria. The project is an excellent example of increasing teachers’ motivation and upskilling them so they do not feel alone in the important task to bring up the future generation of Europe.

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After closing this meeting, I go back to my office to prepare for the next day, touch base with my team on constituency issues, committee files, and update my Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Home sweet home, where time is irrelevant and my son and husband give me a priceless serenity.

 

The British chamber blog is written by guest authors and does not reflect the views of the chamber.

Infirmiers de rue – pioneers in the idea of Ending Street Homelessness

It all started with two young nurses, Emilie and Sarah, who were convinced that street homelessness is not a fate, and something we do not have to accept. In 2005 they created the non-profit organisation Street nurses in Brussels. Their job initially consisted of taking care of the health of the homeless by cleaning wounds during their trips through the city and going to meet the most vulnerable people in our society. Quickly they realised that their health is not getting any better on the street. Therefore, these people need a home. Over the years comes the awareness that in order to have housing, housing opportunities must be created.

Building bridges

There are a lot of social services providing food, shelter, clothes, showers, and other resources to the homeless, but guidance is lacking. These people are so vulnerable they need professional help to get out of the street, and this is where we come in. We are building bridges between the most vulnerable people in our society, their environment, and health care services.

Street nurses is convinced that in order to end homelessness, we have to work on three major components for a global approach to face the problem. First of all, our dynamic team of nurses and social workers actively goes out and finds people living on the street. We accompany our patients for several years, guiding them from the street to a stable home, and continue to follow-up on them even after they have moved in to prevent any return to the street.

As our organisation aims to build bridges between the homeless people and the different existing services to help them, we are glad to share our knowledge and experience with other professionals who encounter them. This year, more than 340 people benefited from the hygiene & vulnerability training that we organise.

There are some facilities for homeless people like public fountains, toilets, and showers, but they do not especially know where these are located. This is why it is important to work on infrastructure and access to information. We make these facilities effective by helping people to get to know them with maps which are regularly updated. We also spread information about hyper- and hypothermia prevention, as well as other sickness prevention.

100 people out of the street

Working on these three aspects at the same time has proven effective, because by now more than one hundred homeless people in Brussels have returned to a much safer, healthier and more enjoyable life and are now living on their own or in institutions, according to their needs and thanks to our services.

 Not only were we able to rehouse more than one hundred vulnerable people, but we also changed the mentality in this field. The organisation was a pioneer in believing that we can end street homelessness in Brussels, and by now the vast majority of organisations accepts the idea that this goal is achievable in the medium term. We hope that making Brussels free of homelessness will provide an example for other cities in our country and beyond.

 

Our role as a society

As a society, we should invest in support for the most vulnerable people, for they should not be excluded from our society. They should be a priority, because only with the necessary guidance and support can they make a decent living again. The society should put the necessary efforts into making core needs and basic rights accessible, even to the most vulnerable people. Having a roof above your head or enough food and water are rights enshrined in the constitution.

In our daily work, we focus on the hygiene and the self-esteem of every person we follow. We believe everyone has wonderful resources and talents and we try to put these forward, helping people to believe in themselves again. We respect our patients with their own choices and preferences. Every person has their own life story and past to deal with and we respect their rhythm, take the time they need to improve their situation and get them out of the street.

 

Social justice as a solution

Our advocacy for more support and follow-up for the homeless people is part of our vision of social justice. What we want to achieve is equal access for everybody to the different services included in our healthcare system. In order to make this possible, justice is not enough. Justice means that everybody is equal, which implies that the same effort should be done to make some service accessible to someone. In reality, vulnerable people need more help to get access to those same services, because they stay way further behind. What we ask for is social justice, which does not mean that everyone gets the same help, but the same access, no matter how much effort has to be put into certain groups to help them get access. With this definition of social justice, proportionated universalism is made real.

“Resourcing and delivering universal services at a scale and intensity proportionate to the degree of need” (NHS, 2014), also known as proportionated universalism, is the best available solution to help the ones who need it. In this sense, social justice is a value we should cherish and hold dear. The benefits of proportionated universalism are numerous. First of all, in this system, nobody is left apart. The most vulnerable people, but also the people with a precarious lifestyle can get enough help. For society in general, this term is given sense and the end of homelessness is something we can all be part of. Also in our field we can be a source of inspiration for other organisations and services by carrying the idea that it is a matter of rights and that it is possible to achieve our goal, a city without homelessness.

For social services, it is a matter of responsibility to be accessible to those in need, and even if they are mostly favourable, they do not always have the means to overcome the difficulties the care of the patient brings with it. They should get the necessary support to learn how to handle different cases. Being open-minded and showing flexibility in procedures is not a matter of making rules unimportant, it means adapting to your public to help them in the best way you can. The future is in our hands, the solution is ours, and by taking responsibility as a society, we can and will end street homelessness.

Works Cited

NHS, S. (2014, October). Proportionate universalism and health inequalities. Retrieved from healthscotland.com: http://www.healthscotland.com/uploads/documents/24296-ProportionateUniversalismBriefing.pdf

 

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