The yearly charity baking competition organised by the Brussels New Generation, the young professionals group of the British Chamber, is back for a 6th edition!

About the charity…

CHS small logoThe event, like in the past years, will raise money for the Community Help Services (CHS), a Brussels-based non-profit organisation that provides a free 24/7 confidential English-speaking helpline.
Their work is extremely important for the expat and local community and they seriously need our help to continue the amazing work they’ve been doing so far. So this year more than ever we would like to raise as much as possible for CHS.

About the theme…

In the past years we have seen amazing cakes in all shapes and sizes, showing off the teams baking abilities as well as their creative talents.

After the sugar paste feast of the previous years, induced by our wacky themes and categories, we thought that coming back to the art of simple baking would be very welcomed by the audience as well as the jury.
Therefore, this year we are going back to baking basics, hence the tagline Bake to Basics (get it? Bake –Back, shout-out to our intern Luca for coming up with it).

And the categories for the 2018 edition are…

categories Bake to Basics

The teams will be sorted into categories on the 4th of May live on the Brussels New Generation Facebook page.

About participating…

You can join in the fun in different ways:

  1. Register a team of max.4 and get baking for a good cause. Click here for more information and team registration.
  2. If you are not much of a baker you can join us as a taster on the evening of the 28th of May  (tasters registration will open on the 7th of May).
  3. You can also become a CHS Donor, a Drink Sponsor, or Gift Donor. For more information on that feel free to contact

We look forward to seeing you there!





Eva Maydell is a Bulgarian MEP in the EPP Group. She is a member of the IMCO committee and substitute in ECON. In 2017, she was elected as President of the largest pro-European organisation European Movement International and the first woman to take this position in the organisation’s history.

We caught up with her a couple of weeks ago for another insight into the day to day lives of MEPs at the European Parliament.

Three years into the mandate, there is definitely not a single day that was the same as another. I’m constantly racing against time. Don’t get me wrong, I love this dynamism of my job and it’s definitely one of the reasons why I love doing it.

January 24th, the Bulgarian Presidency has already started and I consider this as an opportunity to promote my country in every possible way. Because of the Presidency, I believe many people in Brussels and Europe will see that Bulgaria is a vibrant European member state, giving opportunities for businesses and young entrepreneurs to develop their ideas.

Making our way through the Brussels traffic en route to the Committee of the Regions, where I am about to open the conference on building the entrepreneurial ecosystems of the future. Traffic could be a slight boredom, yet I try to make use of this time and speak with my team over the phone, planning the day and quickly going through e-mails. Here I am, arriving at the CoR and it is exciting to meet and talk with representatives from regions across the EU, see the energy and passion they put into creating the right conditions for entrepreneurship to thrive.

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On my way back to the European Parliament, I managed to squeeze a phone interview on the Western Balkans. It is crucial for the EU to be involved in the processes there for reasons of stability, solidarity and security. Quickly passing through the office to get some documents and I am rushing on to the ECON Committee to hear Bulgarian Minister Goranov outlining the Bulgarian Presidency Priorities.

I head off to the first Board Meeting of the European Movement International which I am President of. Upon my election as President of EMI I stated that we must try to bring more Europeans to the project through uniting all pro-European forces of the continent, by starting and supporting the real, bottom-up pan-European debate on the Future of Europe, while positioning EMI as a cornerstone organisation that reaches beyond the European institutions [run on sentence]. It is crucial also to ‘win’ the hearts and minds of the next generation, to encourage them to feel European and call themselves Europeans, for a more united, stronger and inspiring Europe; one that doesn’t fail on its principles. Today’s board meeting was one to try and map out how we will achieve this ambitious agenda.

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Going back to the Parliament, I’m passing by my favourite place to grab a fresh orange juice. In the hectic environment of the EP I really try to make time for fresh juices, vegetables and fruits in order to I keep my body and mind energised.

Kicking off my last event on the agenda today. I have the pleasure to bring together the Bulgarian Minister on Education and my fellow colleagues across the different political groups to discuss quality education and a new pilot project, partnered with Teach for Bulgaria. The project is an excellent example of increasing teachers’ motivation and upskilling them so they do not feel alone in the important task to bring up the future generation of Europe.

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After closing this meeting, I go back to my office to prepare for the next day, touch base with my team on constituency issues, committee files, and update my Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Home sweet home, where time is irrelevant and my son and husband give me a priceless serenity.


The British chamber blog is written by guest authors and does not reflect the views of the chamber.

Infirmiers de rue – pioneers in the idea of Ending Street Homelessness

It all started with two young nurses, Emilie and Sarah, who were convinced that street homelessness is not a fate, and something we do not have to accept. In 2005 they created the non-profit organisation Street nurses in Brussels. Their job initially consisted of taking care of the health of the homeless by cleaning wounds during their trips through the city and going to meet the most vulnerable people in our society. Quickly they realised that their health is not getting any better on the street. Therefore, these people need a home. Over the years comes the awareness that in order to have housing, housing opportunities must be created.

Building bridges

There are a lot of social services providing food, shelter, clothes, showers, and other resources to the homeless, but guidance is lacking. These people are so vulnerable they need professional help to get out of the street, and this is where we come in. We are building bridges between the most vulnerable people in our society, their environment, and health care services.

Street nurses is convinced that in order to end homelessness, we have to work on three major components for a global approach to face the problem. First of all, our dynamic team of nurses and social workers actively goes out and finds people living on the street. We accompany our patients for several years, guiding them from the street to a stable home, and continue to follow-up on them even after they have moved in to prevent any return to the street.

As our organisation aims to build bridges between the homeless people and the different existing services to help them, we are glad to share our knowledge and experience with other professionals who encounter them. This year, more than 340 people benefited from the hygiene & vulnerability training that we organise.

There are some facilities for homeless people like public fountains, toilets, and showers, but they do not especially know where these are located. This is why it is important to work on infrastructure and access to information. We make these facilities effective by helping people to get to know them with maps which are regularly updated. We also spread information about hyper- and hypothermia prevention, as well as other sickness prevention.

100 people out of the street

Working on these three aspects at the same time has proven effective, because by now more than one hundred homeless people in Brussels have returned to a much safer, healthier and more enjoyable life and are now living on their own or in institutions, according to their needs and thanks to our services.

 Not only were we able to rehouse more than one hundred vulnerable people, but we also changed the mentality in this field. The organisation was a pioneer in believing that we can end street homelessness in Brussels, and by now the vast majority of organisations accepts the idea that this goal is achievable in the medium term. We hope that making Brussels free of homelessness will provide an example for other cities in our country and beyond.


Our role as a society

As a society, we should invest in support for the most vulnerable people, for they should not be excluded from our society. They should be a priority, because only with the necessary guidance and support can they make a decent living again. The society should put the necessary efforts into making core needs and basic rights accessible, even to the most vulnerable people. Having a roof above your head or enough food and water are rights enshrined in the constitution.

In our daily work, we focus on the hygiene and the self-esteem of every person we follow. We believe everyone has wonderful resources and talents and we try to put these forward, helping people to believe in themselves again. We respect our patients with their own choices and preferences. Every person has their own life story and past to deal with and we respect their rhythm, take the time they need to improve their situation and get them out of the street.


Social justice as a solution

Our advocacy for more support and follow-up for the homeless people is part of our vision of social justice. What we want to achieve is equal access for everybody to the different services included in our healthcare system. In order to make this possible, justice is not enough. Justice means that everybody is equal, which implies that the same effort should be done to make some service accessible to someone. In reality, vulnerable people need more help to get access to those same services, because they stay way further behind. What we ask for is social justice, which does not mean that everyone gets the same help, but the same access, no matter how much effort has to be put into certain groups to help them get access. With this definition of social justice, proportionated universalism is made real.

“Resourcing and delivering universal services at a scale and intensity proportionate to the degree of need” (NHS, 2014), also known as proportionated universalism, is the best available solution to help the ones who need it. In this sense, social justice is a value we should cherish and hold dear. The benefits of proportionated universalism are numerous. First of all, in this system, nobody is left apart. The most vulnerable people, but also the people with a precarious lifestyle can get enough help. For society in general, this term is given sense and the end of homelessness is something we can all be part of. Also in our field we can be a source of inspiration for other organisations and services by carrying the idea that it is a matter of rights and that it is possible to achieve our goal, a city without homelessness.

For social services, it is a matter of responsibility to be accessible to those in need, and even if they are mostly favourable, they do not always have the means to overcome the difficulties the care of the patient brings with it. They should get the necessary support to learn how to handle different cases. Being open-minded and showing flexibility in procedures is not a matter of making rules unimportant, it means adapting to your public to help them in the best way you can. The future is in our hands, the solution is ours, and by taking responsibility as a society, we can and will end street homelessness.

Works Cited

NHS, S. (2014, October). Proportionate universalism and health inequalities. Retrieved from


Saturday, the 27th January, marks the annual International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust, as designated by the United Nations (UN).

It’s a day to commemorate and remember the Holocaust, and reflect on the 6 million Jewish people killed, as well as the persecution and deaths of Roma, LGBT and disabled people.

World leaders and survivors speak out around the Holocaust, its aftermath and why it should never be forgotten.

Much emphasis is put on the need for future generations to learn about the Holocaust and for the world to work towards preventing genocide. This year the theme is “Holocaust Remembrance and Education: Our Shared Responsibility”.

In Britain, the 11th of November is the day most synonymous with Remembrance, however, Remembrance is something that takes place all year round.

There are many different reference points, such as the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust, which give people a chance to reflect on the horrors and lessons of previous conflicts and historical events, and the importance of remembering them.

Britain as a nation has strong links to the international Jewish community and has a growing one within it too. It was also British soldiers that liberated the infamous Bergen-Belson concentration camp in Nazi Germany, in 1945.

The Royal British Legion in its role as National Custodian of Remembrance exists to ensure that the memory and sacrifice from the First World War to present day conflicts are not forgotten.

Today the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire, which is part of The Royal British Legion, will hold a Holocaust Memorial Day chapel service to mark the day.

We are proud of our partnership with a range of Jewish community organisations across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and we remember the 41,000 British Jews who fought in World War One, and the 65,000 who fought in World War Two.

We work closely with Jewish Veteran Associations like The Association of Jewish Ex-Servicemen and Women to raise awareness that the percentage of Jewish men and women killed on active service during the two wars was the highest of any ethnic group, and of the Jewish soldiers who were recognised for their bravery, including eight Victoria Cross recipients.

Every year the Association of Jewish Ex-Servicemen and Women join 10,000 other veterans at the Legion’s March Past the Cenotaph on the 11th November, in Whitehall.

As WW2 fades from living memory, the challenge that faces Remembrance as a whole, not just the Legion, is maintaining the events in modern consciousness and making them relevant to younger audiences.  This is a challenge we cannot take on our own, however.  It is therefore that I urge business leaders to not only reflect on the Holocaust today, but to think about how you can leverage your company’s history, resources and communities to help keep the torch of Remembrance alive and ensure it is passed on to the next generation in good stead.

Just like the theme of the Annual International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust states – Remembrance is a shared responsibility.

Claire Bury

What does a Deputy Director General do in the European Commission?  My job is to help the Director General run a Directorate General in the European Commission.   A Directorate General, DG for short, is the equivalent of a Ministry in a country.  My DG, DG CONNECT, looks after telecoms, digital and tech policy, online content, ICT research and media and digital culture issues for the Commission.  I work with about 1200 experts based in Brussels and Luxembourg who work on topics ranging from robots to roaming, from start-ups to spectrum policy, from copyright rules to quantum computing. We advise the College of Commissioners on all things digital.  In the case of DG CONNECT, our direct political bosses are Commissioner Gabriel, responsible for the Digital Economy and Society and Vice President Ansip, responsible for the Digital Single Market.

I’m a lawyer by training, and have been in the European Commission since 1992. I’ve worked with many different Commissioners and in different departments dealing with everything from human rights and democratisation to postal services and company law. I joined DG CONNECT In January 2016.

In an average week, I spend a third of my time with colleagues  in the DG, a third of my time working with the Commissioners’ political advisers and in other Commission departments and the rest of my time with colleagues either in the Council, European Parliament and external stakeholders.

I go to a lot of meetings. You cannot escape this! Every week, the DG’s senior management team meets to discuss the issues of the week.  We also meet the Commissioner and the Vice –President and their teams to get political guidance on our work. I also meet my Directors every two weeks to discuss the hot digital topics of the day, staffing and finance issues. I also run DG CONNECT’s diversity and inclusion network which is very rewarding.

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On a good day, I work from 8 to 7, but I’m often checking emails or reading later in the evenings or over weekends.

I love working on digital policy. It’s a very rewarding policy area, where we can make a difference to people’s lives and opportunities.  Whether you work in agriculture, marketing, manufacturing, fashion or in a shop, you will need digital tools to get your job done and will need a fast and affordable internet or mobile connection whether you are at home or travelling abroad.  This is what we are trying to achieve in DG CONNECT.  We are working to deliver the digital single market and ensure that people have access to the digital world and online content wherever they are. We are also trying to ensure that Europe is ahead of the game when it comes to cybersecurity, 5G, High Performance Computing and in digitising industry. For Europe’s authors, journalists, artists, audiovisual professional and other content providers we are pushing to make sure that their creativity is recognised and rewarded fairly.

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Claire Bury – Deputy Director General, DG Connect – October 2017

Shoot4Change and Crowdphotography: creativity, social engagement and collective storytelling

I created S4C (acronym for Shoot4Change, in the middle of 2009 just after the earthquake in L’Aquila, central Italy.

Born as a simple blog, it has taken on an international dimension and spirit, aggregating hidden creative minds on social networks, on the street, eventually transforming itself into a real movement.

Which, in the lazy world of photography, is a good news!

S4C is an international nonprofit social photographic volunteer association; a movement of volunteers, of people who want to go down the street to tell stories. Those small, sometimes tiny, stories that are rarely considered profitable by mainstream information. And that is why they are not made known, failing to trigger a process that could have a real impact on social change.

In a nutshell, S4C’s core business is to raise awareness on social issues, those stories that are undervalued, forgotten or ignored, of whom the world, silently, really brings about a positive change, creatively helping the sufferer. Those sparkles of Life even in the most dramatic situations.

S4C volunteers are not only photographers, but also video-makers, journalists, charters, designers, musicians. They all share the concept of “crowdphotography”.

Crowdphotography, a term coined by S4C, is a simple concept: Storytelling can be collective, democratic, and horizontal.

It is an extraordinary “social control” tool with which anyone can say ‘We, the People’ and tell a story, without waiting for others to do it in their place.

It is a quality citizen journalism, which not only refers to “facts” but tells stories. It imposes a reality observation at 0km with open eyes and loaded cameras. Creative visual communication at the service of social awareness.

Which is what Photography should be about, isn’t it?

We believe that by calling for a collective storytelling, or even an individual one, of social issues or just simply day to day Life, putting a camera, a cell phone or any other visual communication tool at work in synergy with the internet and the social media, this can trigger dynamics of real social change. But not a naïve, ideal, utopian change. A small individual change of the Storyteller him/herself, who – after telling (and reading) – a story can no longer say, “I did not know, I did not understand.”


The camera, then, becomes a powerful tool for self-reflection but also for analysis and observation of our society. Useful for those who hold it and for those on the other side of the lens.

Those who take a picture acquire awareness of the social reality in which they live, and those whose story is told relinquish their dignity and their own story with an act of trust that strengthens human ties.

In S4C we often say that getting into a story is easy for us. Coming out of it is very difficult.

So, S4C is a hub of stories and storytellers. Right.


But it’s also a platform of educational projects aiming to give opportunities to those who are in the outskirts of our societies: we constantly run photography/video making classes for free for those who cannot afford it. Homeless, refugees, asylum seekers…. We look for those amazing “hidden in plain sight” creatives whom are considered invisible.


Despite its social agenda, Shoot4Change will remain nonpolitical and totally independent.


We are planning to grow the movement, unearthing the next generation of storytellers to tell those untold stories and let people see beyond the headlines and look at real life through the lens.


But we need help. Our budget is next to zero (as it always has been, despite the amazing achievement of our volunteers).


We do not ask for financial help, nor any other help but a creative, enthusiastic, contagious support of new eyes and minds.


Because, as the African motto says “if you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together”.



Dita Charanzová is a Member of the European Parliament for the Group of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe. MEP Charanzová is the Vice-Chair of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection. She is also a member of several delegations including; the Delegation to the Cariforum-EU Parliamentary Committee, Delegation for relations with Mercosur and the Delegation to the Euro-Latin American Parliamentary Assembly. 

091 Future of Mobility by Alexander Louvet

I am wondering which day to choose. Some days are more typical than others in my work programme. For instance Mondays, which mark the start of my working week in Brussels. My typical Monday would begin around six o’clock in the morning, when I need to pick out clothes for my two daughters for the entire upcoming week. It is necessary to think about every day of the week and every class, and not to give them too much room for creativity when, for example, they try to convince their Dad to let them wear a summer dress even though it is snowing outside. Everything is set, the piles of clothes are ready, the food I cooked during the weekend is stocked in the freezer and breakfast is on the table. It is time to wake up the girls and, if possible, to finish the morning ritual which implies taking them to school, waving and saying goodbye. And then off starts my regular journey to Brussels by car, which is roughly four hours long. I often get asked if this is not tiring, but I actually enjoy driving and I drive a lot (40 000 km each year). I have my favourite gas stations on the way to Brussels, where the staff greet me as an old acquaintance after three years. It has its charm. But as soon as I leave Strasbourg behind, my car transforms into a mobile office. My colleagues’ phones in Brussels and Prague start to ring as we need to plan for the whole week together. We set the agenda, go over any issues; basically if there is something we can do over the phone, we just do it. This way we do not waste time, which is difficult to find once I arrive to Brussels anyways.


A completely different situation occurs, of course, if I go directly to the Brussels or Strasbourg office and do not have to spend four hours in the car.  I practice yoga in the morning, which is something I try not to skip. I pick up something for breakfast and go to the office- I’m usually there around 8 o’clock. I then briefly go over the agenda of the day with my team, which consists of three colleagues and a Czech trainee. I am the Vice-Chair of the IMCO Committee and a substitute of the INTA Committee, so I usually spend my mornings and afternoons at these two committee meetings. The scope of the issues discussed is very wide, however I try to cover those issues in a detailed manner nonetheless. It is not enough to just attend the committee meetings though, I also need to go through documents and related reports, opinions and conclusions from other colleagues. And there are a lot of documents to go through- counting the documents could often be done by the kilo rather than by individual pages. But we are not there yet in my day. I usually go over and study documents thoroughly only in the evening, or rather at night, once the work day calms down.

 074 Future of Mobility by Alexander Louvet

Now we are still in the European Parliament, where I have just skipped lunch, which I do not have time for in nine out of ten cases. Regular or irregular meetings with representatives of the Venezuelan opposition or with my Czech female MEP colleagues for example, could be an exception and I really enjoy having lunch with them. When we eat we leave our different political views in the cloakroom with our coats. However I am most happy if I can grab a soup or salad on my way so that I can at least eat something relatively healthy.


And then the afternoon marathon begins. That implies a series of meetings, formal and informal, which are also part of an MEP’s work. We also often meet with students from different parts of the Czech Republic, which I like to invite to visit the European Parliament both in Brussels and Strasbourg. Another part of my agenda that occupies me and certainly makes part of an MEP’s profile day consists of public appearances at conferences, panels, or round tables, including those which I organise myself. For that, we have to reserve at least a few minutes a day in the office to go over what needs to be done, who to contact or talk to. Previously, for example, I organised a conference on the future of the automotive industry in the EU. We brought together the main stakeholders, including the relevant Commissioner, representatives of the car industry and colleagues from the European Parliament. The conference also included a real Formula-E race car installation right in front of the European Parliament building in Brussels (I do not know which took more energy to organise; this year’s e-Formula installation or last year’s show of a self-driving car that was also in front of the Parliament).


Even in the evening I have several items in my agenda. Sometimes it’s a working dinner, sometimes a dinner at the Aspen Institute, where I am a Board member. From time to time, I take part in TV or radio debates for both Czech and foreign media. But if it is possible, I leave the public space at least around eight, and prefer to go home. When I am in Brussels and my agenda allows it, I like to meet my Czech friends working in Brussels that moved here years ago and stayed.  When I’m in Strasbourg, I run home to get back to my family. I like to cook at home, which is one of the activities that helps me relax. My two girls appreciate my sweet pancakes the most, which do not require any great culinary creativity on one hand, but on the other they are able to consume so many that it allows me to relax for a while. And I’m glad I can partly compensate for those days when I am not at home with them. I sometimes have the feeling that my two daughters are gradually becoming hardline Eurosceptics. Whenever I mention anything related to my trips to Brussels, they are very clear with what they think about it.


The work of an MEP is incredibly fulfilling for me. I value every achievement and I can see how much work it requires. I must admit, however, that at the beginning of my mandate I could not imagine how demanding it would be and how much I would have to travel. My suitcase has become a part of my daily life.

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