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A Day in the life of

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My days begin with my cat looking at me and he is not happy: he was not allowed to spend the night in my bedroom, and he wants me to know his displeasure. The fact that I drink my coffee and read the news distracts me from playing with him, and that doesn’t help.

That’s the only predictable moment in my day as an Ambassador in Belgium.

 

 

Whenever I can, I walk to the office, a 40-minute walk, a moment to consider the day ahead, a moment to put my thoughts together, a moment to plan. And yes, a moment when I’m feeling lucky because I don’t have to drive to work.

But I often have to hit the road. I’m also accredited to Luxembourg and I probably know by now all the bumps on the road between the two capitals, as I know also most of them between Brussels and Ieper, Antwerp, Namur and so many other cities. I come from a federation, like Belgium: I know that the capital is beautiful and important, I know that one needs to leave it to meet the entire country.

The geography is not the only challenge. In the same day I can deliver a demarche on a foreign policy issue, meet an artist, visit a company, be informed of a consular case, attend an official event, plan another one, complain (silently) about a bureaucratic requirement, draft or revise a note, brainstorm with colleagues, check on them. And make a speech.

I speak in public often: at business events; at commemoration ceremonies; on so many other diverse occasions. And because my 92-year old mother who lives in Montreal wants pictures of me, I send her pictures of those events. She then asks me if I’m doing something other than just speaking. “Yes mother, I’m also sending you pictures of me speaking.”

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Because this year is the 100th anniversary of the battle of Passchendaele I spend a lot of time attending commemoration ceremonies. For the last two months I didn’t need to worry about what I would do come the weekend. The small ceremonies, sometimes with Canadian families present, are the most touching: there is hesitation and lovely mistakes, the protocol is imperfect, the children who play a role look at me with pride and nervousness, the emotions run high, it’s life as its best –as we remember those many soldiers who lost their own.

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But I also have to be present on social media. Diplomacy is a very old profession and if its logic has not changed, its tools have. I was told that I have to be active on the social media. I tried to argue that I was raised in another world, a world where the printed word was everything, but the argument was dismissed. I don’t have my kids with me to help me, I’m missing them -and I miss my electric typewriter.

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There is always an occasion in my day to remind me that to work in Brussels as Canadian Ambassador for bilateral relations is a real privilege. Our countries are really close, our relations are deeply and emotionally rooted in the tragic European history, the trade relationship keeps growing, the number of active links between our various institutions is impossible to count, and there is real friendship even we don’t agree on all issues.

And then I come back home, but my day is not necessarily over. My colleagues in Ottawa seem to get a new burst of energy at the end of their day, forgetting that by then I’m well into my night. The internet knows no time zones, but my body does.

And my cat complains that I don’t let him in the bedroom.

Claire Bury

What does a Deputy Director General do in the European Commission?  My job is to help the Director General run a Directorate General in the European Commission.   A Directorate General, DG for short, is the equivalent of a Ministry in a country.  My DG, DG CONNECT, looks after telecoms, digital and tech policy, online content, ICT research and media and digital culture issues for the Commission.  I work with about 1200 experts based in Brussels and Luxembourg who work on topics ranging from robots to roaming, from start-ups to spectrum policy, from copyright rules to quantum computing. We advise the College of Commissioners on all things digital.  In the case of DG CONNECT, our direct political bosses are Commissioner Gabriel, responsible for the Digital Economy and Society and Vice President Ansip, responsible for the Digital Single Market.

I’m a lawyer by training, and have been in the European Commission since 1992. I’ve worked with many different Commissioners and in different departments dealing with everything from human rights and democratisation to postal services and company law. I joined DG CONNECT In January 2016.

In an average week, I spend a third of my time with colleagues  in the DG, a third of my time working with the Commissioners’ political advisers and in other Commission departments and the rest of my time with colleagues either in the Council, European Parliament and external stakeholders.

I go to a lot of meetings. You cannot escape this! Every week, the DG’s senior management team meets to discuss the issues of the week.  We also meet the Commissioner and the Vice –President and their teams to get political guidance on our work. I also meet my Directors every two weeks to discuss the hot digital topics of the day, staffing and finance issues. I also run DG CONNECT’s diversity and inclusion network which is very rewarding.

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On a good day, I work from 8 to 7, but I’m often checking emails or reading later in the evenings or over weekends.

I love working on digital policy. It’s a very rewarding policy area, where we can make a difference to people’s lives and opportunities.  Whether you work in agriculture, marketing, manufacturing, fashion or in a shop, you will need digital tools to get your job done and will need a fast and affordable internet or mobile connection whether you are at home or travelling abroad.  This is what we are trying to achieve in DG CONNECT.  We are working to deliver the digital single market and ensure that people have access to the digital world and online content wherever they are. We are also trying to ensure that Europe is ahead of the game when it comes to cybersecurity, 5G, High Performance Computing and in digitising industry. For Europe’s authors, journalists, artists, audiovisual professional and other content providers we are pushing to make sure that their creativity is recognised and rewarded fairly.

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Claire Bury – Deputy Director General, DG Connect – October 2017

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