A Day in the Life of an MEP’s Assistant

Last year, we featured a few pieces from MEP’s in our ‘A Day in the life of…’ series and this week, Adam Terry – Political Officer to Anneliese Dodds MEP at the European Parliament, gives his insight into life as an MEP’s assistant.

Describe a typical day in the life of an MEP’s assistant, you say?  It’s probably best to start off by saying that there is no such thing.  For a start, which day of the week is it?  If it’s a Monday, then there might be a bit of time in the morning to catch my breath and focus on some longer-term projects.  If it’s a Tuesday or a Wednesday, I’ll be lucky to find five minutes to grab a much-needed coffee.  And then what type of week is it?  A plenary week in Strasbourg, a policy-heavy Committee week or a politics-heavy Group week?  All of these things will shape what kind of day I’m about to have – and that’s without the unexpected impact of Harold Macmillan’s famous “events, dear boy, events”.  For argument’s sake, let’s pick a Tuesday in Committee week…

08.30: I’ll do my best to get in before the full madness of the day has begun, to go through press round-up emails and keep an eye out for developments in the areas my MEP is most interested in.  For Anneliese, that means the latest on tax avoidance and evasion, fixing the financial system post-crisis, and (no doubt for every Brit in the Parliament at the moment…) the UK referendum debate.

09.00: Time to head down to the ECON Committee room and see what’s happening.  It could be a hearing with a Commissioner, central bank governor or another economics celebrity.  If Anneliese has speaking time, I will have made sure to provide her with the facts and figures she needs to ask a clear, concise question and (hopefully) get a clear, concise answer back!

12.30: Time for a lunch meeting with stakeholders.  Whatever Anneliese is working on, she will want to be aware of what all the major interested parties have to say about it.  She will want to hear a broad range of opinions – from civil society and NGOs, from her constituents, from government and regulators, and from industry – to ensure she is as well-informed as possible.  I’ll make sure she is well-briefed ahead of the meeting, and keep track of how we might need to follow up.

14.00: A chance to sit at my desk.  The blessing and the curse of the smartphone means I’m able to keep an eye on emails throughout the day, but it’s nice to have a moment in front of my computer to look properly at what’s come in.  I’ll get a chance to catch up on some ECON work and to help the team in the UK answer some of the many thousands of emails Anneliese receives from her constituents.  In the meantime, it will be my colleagues’ turn to staff Anneliese – perhaps supporting her in her role as Chair of the Delegation to Montenegro, or working up a press release or lines to take for an upcoming interview.

15.00: Before too long, it’s back to the Committee room – this time for an exchange of views on one of the many pieces of legislation that pass through the ECON Committee.  If it’s a report where Anneliese is rapporteur or shadow, I’ll have made sure to find out as much as I can in advance about the other groups’ positions and the areas where we might be able to compromise.  The aim is always a report that reflects our S&D values, while gathering enough support from other groups in order to pass that crucial vote.

18.30: Back to the desk and a chance to catch up on everything that has come up during the day, and to start scribbling tomorrow’s to do list.  I’ll look back on today’s to do list, and if it’s been a good day a fair chunk of it will be satisfyingly crossed off in red pen.  If life has thrown a few too many surprises at me, then a lot of today’s list will get transferred straight over to tomorrow’s…

19.30: Time to head home, after a long day which nevertheless seems to have flown by.  There’s certainly no watching the clock in this job.  As I close the door to our office, Anneliese will still be in hers, typing away and preparing to go and give a speech at an event somewhere else.  There are three of us who work for her in Brussels, and we all work flat-out to do so.  How she manages to do everything that’s asked of her, on her own, is beyond me…

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